Challenges

MIWA - Innovative packaging-free supermarket with integrated supply chain

MIWA (www.miwa.eu), a startup in the Czech Republic, has developed a modular system to transport products from manufacturer to consumer without plastic/cardboard packaging. 

"The system is based on reusable capsules and in-store modular units that can be easily integrated into the supply chain: Producers can fill the reusable capsules directly with their products and transport them to the store. In store, customers then fill their own or returnable boxes with the unpackaged goods of their choice."

Source: https://www.startupvalley.news/uk/miwa-packaging-free-shopping-experien…

Could HEMA have a role in this with the production of reusable packaging for consumers?

More information is available here - http://www.miwa.eu/

Comments (6)

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What can go wrong?
Claude Dewerse
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  • Kate, I think that this idea works well for items that we buy everyday. But people like to go shopping and to browse the shelves to see what new or undiscovered thing they can find to try. Or if I am tired of the type of bread I have been eating I want to browse the shelves to see what else I like the look of. I want to be able to look at the options. How could this system be modified to suit this type of shopping? Maybe a supermarket needs a MIWA section for "staple" products?

    Kate Rushton
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  • The containers are clear and see-through and have an image of the product on each container. Maybe there could be a separate section with new produce for people to handle and touch.

    How can this be improved?
    Claude Dewerse
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  • What are the types of container used to take things home in? From what I have seen it looks like everything goes home in glass jars. While that may be OK for a few items, if everything was in glass it would make it prohibitively heavy for a lot of people.
    Glass jars even when empty are quite heavy and their volume when empty doesn't change.
    If some of the packaging could be made from high quality reuseable, stackable plastic, this would decrease the weight and, when returning, the volume as well.

    Kate Rushton
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  • I think this is where HEMA could come in. They sell a lot of reusable containers, which lend themselves for use in this type of system for customers.

    How can this be improved?
    Idoia Letona Castrillo
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  • As Claude said, if the containers were made of high quality durable plastic the transport cost will decrease a lot. I will add another criteria :
    If we could smash the containers, a lot of space will be saved and the transportation will be optimized, reducing the CO2 emission per container. Thus reducing the environmental impact of the product (life cycle analysis approach).
    I think Hema could have a niche here. Maybe by creating an alliance with single use plastic free supermarkets.

    Kate Rushton
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  • Yes, agreed! I know this startup reasonably well. They do have strong expertise in supply chain and logistics so I am sure container durability will be not the biggest issue for the project, especially with the amount of checks in place.